Journal cover Journal topic
Geochronology Advances in geochronological science
Journal topic
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gchron-2020-23
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gchron-2020-23
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  05 Aug 2020

05 Aug 2020

Review status
A revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal GChron and is expected to appear here in due course.

Development of a multi-method chronology spanning the Last Glacial Interval from Orakei maar lake, Auckland, New Zealand

Leonie Peti1, Kathryn E. Fitzsimmons2, Jenni L. Hopkins3, Andreas Nilsson4, Toshiyuki Fujioka5,a, David Fink5, Charles Mifsud5, Marcus Christl6, Raimund Muscheler2, and Paul C. Augustinus1 Leonie Peti et al.
  • 1School of Environment, The University of Auckland, New Zealand
  • 2Research Group for Terrestrial Palaeoclimates, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany
  • 3School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • 4Department of Geology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
  • 5Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, Australia
  • 6Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
  • acurrent address: Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana, Burgos, Spain

Abstract. Northern New Zealand is an important site for understanding Last Glacial Interval (LGI) paleoclimate dynamics, since it is influenced by both tropical and polar climate systems which have varied in relative strength and timing of associated changes. The Auckland Volcanic Field maar lakes preserve these climatic influences on the regional paleoenvironment, as well as past volcanic eruptions, in their sedimentary infill. The sediment sequence infilling Orakei maar lake is continuous, laminated, high-resolution and provides a robust archive from which to investigate the dynamic nature of the northern New Zealand climate system over the LGI. Here we present the chronological framework for the Orakei maar sediment sequence. Our chronology was developed combining Bayesian age modelling of combined radiocarbon ages, tephrochronology of known-age rhyolitic tephra marker layers, 40Ar/39Ar-dated eruption age of a local basaltic volcano, luminescence dating (using post infrared-infrared stimulated luminescence, or pIR-IRSL), and the timing of the Laschamp paleomagnetic excursion. We also investigated the application of meteoric (cosmogenic) Beryllium-10 variability to improve the age-depth model by complementing relative paleointensity measurements. However, the results were apparently influenced by some unaccounted catchment process and unable to reach satisfactory interpretation, apart from confirming the presence of the Laschamp excursion, and therefore the 10Be data are not used in the production of the final age model. We have integrated our absolute chronology with tuning of the relative paleointensity record of the Earth’s magnetic field to a global reference curve (PISO-1500).

The maar-forming phreatomagmatic eruption of the Orakei maar is now dated to > 130,120 yr (95 % confidence range 128,665 to 131,560 yr). Our new chronology facilitates high-resolution paleoenvironmental reconstruction for northern New Zealand spanning the last ca. 130,000 years for the first time as most NZ records that spall all or parts of the LGI are fragmentary, low-resolution and poorly dated. Providing this chronological framework for LGI climate events inferred from the Orakei sequence is of paramount importance in the context of identification of leads and lags in different components of the Southern Hemisphere climate system as well as identification of Northern Hemisphere climate signals.

Leonie Peti et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Leonie Peti et al.

Data sets

Paleomagnetic data from sediment cores OB16A and OB16B from Orakei maar, Auckland, New Zealand. Leonie Peti, Kathryn E. Fitzsimmons, Jenni L. Hopkins, Andreas Nilsson, Toshiyuki Fujioka, David Fink, Charles Mifsud, Marcus Christl, Raimund Muscheler, and Paul C. Augustinus https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.921134

Basaltic tephra composition in sediment cores OB16A and OB16B from Orakei maar, Auckland, New Zealand. Leonie Peti, Kathryn E. Fitzsimmons, Jenni L. Hopkins, Andreas Nilsson, Toshiyuki Fujioka, David Fink, Charles Mifsud, Marcus Christl, Raimund Muscheler, and Paul C. Augustinus https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.921122

Rhyolitic tephra composition in sediment cores OB16A and OB16B from Orakei maar, Auckland, New Zealand. Leonie Peti, Kathryn E. Fitzsimmons, Jenni L. Hopkins, Andreas Nilsson, Toshiyuki Fujioka, David Fink, Charles Mifsud, Marcus Christl, Raimund Muscheler, and Paul C. Augustinus https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.921121

Beryllium-10 in sediment cores OB16A and OB16B from Orakei maar, Auckland, New Zealand. Leonie Peti, Kathryn E. Fitzsimmons, Jenni L. Hopkins, Andreas Nilsson, Toshiyuki Fujioka, David Fink, Charles Mifsud, Marcus Christl, Raimund Muscheler, and Paul C. Augustinus https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.920773

Leonie Peti et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 575 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
468 102 5 575 1 5
  • HTML: 468
  • PDF: 102
  • XML: 5
  • Total: 575
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 5
Views and downloads (calculated since 05 Aug 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 05 Aug 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 432 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 429 with geography defined and 3 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 25 Nov 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Orakei Basin, a former maar lake in Auckland, New Zealand provides an outstanding sediment record over the last ca. 130,000 years but an age model is required to allow the reconstruction of climate change and volcanic eruptions contained in the sequence. To construct a relationship between depth in the sediment core and age of deposition, we combined tephrochronology, radiocarbon dating, luminescence dating, and the relative intensity of the paleomagnetic field in a Bayesian age-depth model.
Orakei Basin, a former maar lake in Auckland, New Zealand provides an outstanding sediment...
Citation