Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gchron-2024-9
https://doi.org/10.5194/gchron-2024-9
16 Apr 2024
 | 16 Apr 2024
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal GChron.

Krypton-85 chronometry of spent nuclear fuel

Greg Balco, Andrew J. Conant, Dallas D. Reilly, Dallin Barton, Chelsea D. Willett, and Brett H. Isselhardt

Abstract. We describe the use of the radionuclide 85Kr, which is produced by nuclear fission and has a half-life of 10.74 years, to determine the age of spent nuclear fuel.

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Greg Balco, Andrew J. Conant, Dallas D. Reilly, Dallin Barton, Chelsea D. Willett, and Brett H. Isselhardt

Status: open (until 09 Jun 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on gchron-2024-9', Ingo Leya, 17 May 2024 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on gchron-2024-9', Anonymous Referee #2, 23 May 2024 reply
Greg Balco, Andrew J. Conant, Dallas D. Reilly, Dallin Barton, Chelsea D. Willett, and Brett H. Isselhardt
Greg Balco, Andrew J. Conant, Dallas D. Reilly, Dallin Barton, Chelsea D. Willett, and Brett H. Isselhardt

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Short summary
This paper describes how krypton isotopes produced by nuclear fission can be used to determine the age of microscopic particles of used nuclear fuel. This is potentially useful for international safeguards applications aimed at tracking and identifying nuclear materials, as well as geoscience applications involving dating post-1950's sediments or understanding environmental transport of nuclear materials.