Articles | Volume 4, issue 1
Geochronology, 4, 87–107, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/gchron-4-87-2022
Geochronology, 4, 87–107, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/gchron-4-87-2022
Research article
28 Jan 2022
Research article | 28 Jan 2022

A 62 kyr geomagnetic palaeointensity record from the Taymyr Peninsula, Russian Arctic

Stephanie Scheidt et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • CC1: 'Comment on gchron-2021-12', Ian Snowball, 06 Jul 2021
    • CC2: 'Reply on CC1', Stephanie Scheidt, 07 Jul 2021
  • RC1: 'Comment on gchron-2021-12', Anonymous Referee #1, 07 Jul 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Stephanie Scheidt, 12 Aug 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on gchron-2021-12', Anonymous Referee #2, 10 Jul 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Stephanie Scheidt, 12 Aug 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Stephanie Scheidt, 12 Aug 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (27 Aug 2021) by Julie Durcan
AR by Stephanie Scheidt on behalf of the Authors (14 Sep 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (19 Sep 2021) by Julie Durcan
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (08 Dec 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (further review by editor) (10 Dec 2021) by Julie Durcan
AR by Stephanie Scheidt on behalf of the Authors (13 Dec 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (14 Dec 2021) by Julie Durcan
ED: Publish as is (14 Dec 2021) by Georgina King(Editor)
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Short summary
Levinson-Lessing Lake in northern central Siberia provides an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of the Earth's magnetic field in the Arctic. This is the first study carried out at the lake that focus on the palaeomagnetic record. It presents the relative palaeointensity and palaeosecular variation of the upper 38 m of sediment core Co1401, spanning ~62 kyr. A comparable high-resolution record of this time does not exist in the Eurasian Arctic.