Articles | Volume 4, issue 1
Geochronology, 4, 311–322, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/gchron-4-311-2022
Geochronology, 4, 311–322, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/gchron-4-311-2022
Research article
25 May 2022
Research article | 25 May 2022

Reconciling the apparent absence of a Last Glacial Maximum alpine glacial advance, Yukon Territory, Canada, through cosmogenic beryllium-10 and carbon-14 measurements

Brent M. Goehring et al.

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Cited articles

Applegate, P. J., Urban, N. M., Laabs, B. J. C., Keller, K., and Alley, R. B.: Modeling the statistical distributions of cosmogenic exposure dates from moraines, Geosci. Model Dev., 3, 293–307, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-3-293-2010, 2010. 
Applegate, P. J., Urban, N. M., Keller, K., Lowell, T. V., Laabs, B. J. C., Kelly, M. A., and Alley, R. B.: Improved moraine age interpretations through explicit matching of geomorphic process models to cosmogenic nuclide measurements from single landforms, Quaternary Res., 77, 293–304, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yqres.2011.12.002, 2012. 
Balco, G.: Contributions and unrealized potential contributions of cosmogenic-nuclide exposure dating to glacier chronology, 1990–2010, Quaternary Sci. Rev., 30, 3–27, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2010.11.003, 2011. 
Balco, G., Stone, J. O. H., Sliwinski, M. G., and Todd, C.: Features of the glacial history of the Transantarctic Mountains inferred from cosmogenic 26Al, 10Be and 21Ne concentrations in bedrock surfaces, Antarct. Science, 26, 708–723, https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954102014000261, 2014. 
Balco, G.: Production rate calculations for cosmic-ray-muon-produced 10Be and 26Al benchmarked against geological calibration data, Quat. Geochron., 39, 150–173, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quageo.2017.02.001, 2017. 
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Short summary
We explored surface exposure dating with two nuclides to date two sets of moraines from the Yukon Territory and explain the reasoning for the observed ages. Results suggest multiple processes, including preservation of nuclides from a prior exposure period, and later erosion of the moraines is required to explain the data. Our results only allow for the older moraines to date to Marine Isotope Stage 3 or 4 and the younger moraines to date to the very earliest Holocene.